Desné Masie

Desné
Masie

Senior Associate

Desné is a Senior Associate in the financial services practice at Global Counsel. She has 15 years’ experience in financial services, academia, and financial journalism, specialising in capital markets and financial sector policy. 

At Global Counsel, Desné specialises in the regulation of cross-border financial services and financial technologies. She is a specialist in emerging markets frameworks for financial services, with particular experience in the regulatory politics and policy of Sub-Saharan Africa. 

Before joining Global Counsel, Desné’s past roles have included senior roles advising both public and private sector clients at Alexander Forbes Financial Services and thought leadership at Investec Asset Management. 

Desné is a fellow in international political economy at the Wits School of Governance, the leading public policy school in Africa. Desné has lectured on public economics and legal aspects of international finance at Wits and SOAS. She has written for a range of financial media, including the Financial Mail. Desné was named in Innovate Finance’s 2017 Women in Fintech Powerlist for work on financial services.  

Articles by Desné Masie on the GC Blog and GC analysis

The UK could be more ambitious on African fintech - but this is a good start

Author: 
Masie
19 Sep 2018
|
Region: 
Africa

On her visit to sub-Saharan Africa a few weeks ago, UK prime minister, Theresa May, set out an ambition for the UK to become Africa’s biggest G7 investor by 2022. The announcement came alongside some £4 bn in foreign direct investment (FDI) commitments announced during the visit. This was the first visit by a British prime minister to Sub-Saharan Africa in five years, and the first to Kenya in thirty – and fits with a broader narrative about the key role Africa will play in the UK’s post-Brexit economic and trade strategies.

“Cryptocurrencies” vs “crypto-assets”: the regulatory battle for a token taxonomy

Author: 
Masie
2 Jul 2018
|
Region: 
UK

The Bank of England’s governor, Mark Carney, said in a speech in March that it is better to refer to cryptocurrencies as “crypto-assets” - that is, to see them as securities, “expressly because they are not true currencies”. The US SEC, on the other hand, took a more nuanced approach two weeks ago when  it clarified that cryptocurrencies themselves are not securities, but that the capital-raising activities using cryptocurrency technology can be.